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#41 23 Feb 2017 01:27

Hjorn
Blessed, And Cursed Not

Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

Wasn't honestly feeling that EP. Sounded like a simpler, subdued Arca which wasn't bad per se but just wasn't as fun, wild or experimental like Twig's 2 eps. Still on the lookout for Kelela's future stuff though.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZCCey_22ws

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#42 23 Feb 2017 20:53

funbox
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Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

i agree with u but i think they were going for a bit more poppy thing with Kelela, also arca only produced/wrote 2 of the tracks.

but im a way bigger fan of Arcas solo stuff but thats mostly because he can make anything, like windshield wipers, sound cool as fuck.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZStGq1j_c34
Dean Blunt is another favourite artist of mine. i think Dean Blunt and Arca have had the most influence on my own music

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#43 24 Feb 2017 06:19

Hjorn
Blessed, And Cursed Not

Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

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#44 24 Feb 2017 09:28

funbox
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Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

^hell yea mydood!
do u know 18+? theyre also released stuff on houndstooth, weird hyper-accelerated take on radio rnb and trap

IVVVO is insane
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7F2wmQ6cHXI

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#45 25 Feb 2017 00:59

Hjorn
Blessed, And Cursed Not

Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

First time hearing of IVVVO actually which is surprising considering I consider myself pretty knee deep into music like that. That being said not liking that track. Reminds me of H880 which I'm not too big of a fan of.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1HnzWWpEIA

Duo broke up too soon sad

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#46 27 Feb 2017 13:35

funbox
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Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

dont know H880 but just checked him out and ur right, they sound kinda similar, but i think IVVVO bends the genre a bit more
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YW94Psk0Jg
another new Arca

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#47 05 Mar 2017 17:27

funbox
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Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

https://soundcloud.com/gaucho-von-als/m … ldmusick-1

a mix i made for an online radio station im doing with my friends. mostly electronic stuff, all the way from ambient to hiphop to weird EDM

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#48 06 Mar 2017 23:09

floog
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Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

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#49 17 Mar 2017 04:34

flatlander
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Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

funbox wrote:

https://soundcloud.com/gaucho-von-als/m … ldmusick-1

a mix i made for an online radio station im doing with my friends. mostly electronic stuff, all the way from ambient to hiphop to weird EDM

i been fucking with this mix. post the play list dude i wanna know the first song, it's funny af


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#50 17 Mar 2017 06:15

funbox
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Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

flatlander wrote:
funbox wrote:

https://soundcloud.com/gaucho-von-als/m … ldmusick-1

a mix i made for an online radio station im doing with my friends. mostly electronic stuff, all the way from ambient to hiphop to weird EDM

i been fucking with this mix. post the play list dude i wanna know the first song, it's funny af

thanks! first song is by my internet-friend claire

tracklist:
coco & clairclair - knifeplay

inga copeland - so far so clean

burial - distant lights

oneohtrix point never x why be, elysia crampton & chino amobi - describing bodies/dummy track

ADR - every node

arca - self defense

SOPHIE - hard

actress x james ferraro - skyline/baby mitsubishi

lotic - heterocetera

dean blunt - stone island

dean blunt - hennessey

travis scott - maria, im drunk (feat. justin bieber & young thug)

NA - definitely ride on me

ziúr - concord

IVVVO - fear

lil yachty - life goes on

cyrax - true

speaker knockerz - erica kane

IVVVO - tongue kiss crying

john t. gast - jah guidance

gaucho von als - gaucho

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#51 18 Mar 2017 23:51

floog
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Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

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#52 22 Mar 2017 01:26

floog
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Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

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#53 22 Mar 2017 05:08

andru
DWYANE WADE

Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

I thought the most recent Drake project, "More Life," was pretty awful. I hate so much about it. I will say, to begin, that I really just despise Drake as a human being, I think he is a complete culture vulture, has absolutely no respect for the communities he uses, among other things.


I think, certainly, it can't be said that the beats aren't good. The instrumentals on this thing, front-to-back, are pretty solid, but that's pretty par for the course for a Drake album. I would actually be more surprised if there was a Drake project where the beats were bad - his team always puts together a great collection of moody, introspective instrumentals. The one place I think this record falls completely flat on its face, unfortunately, is the dancehall element. To my knowledge, Drake has no right to effectively co-opt this style of music and attempt to make it his own and it drives me nuts hearing him speak in a completely phony Patois accent on these tracks. He could maybe even be of Jamaican descent, it doesn't change the fact that he sounds so preposterously disingenuous that listening to him croak out fake Caribbean slang makes me physically sick to my stomach. To be fair, it's not as though these beats are "bad" in the sense that they aren't well-made beats, it's that the entire idea is garbage to begin with. I don't think Drake has any right to use these sounds. I also think, from a less social-justicey perspective, that I don't care about this sound. It's a style he tried out on "Views," which I have the exact same feelings on, and I think it makes for catchy singles but I would have liked to have seen some.. progression? This album has absolutely no new territory for Drake in terms of beats. Even Views, though I didn't like it, was new in the sense that the dancehall element was a departure from his earlier work. However, his refusal to show any sort of progression in this regard is pretty disappointing, however good the beats actually are.


Similarly, Drake also downright refuses to mature emotionally or lyrically in any capacity. In fact, his rhymes on "Nothing Was the Same" are even much more sympathetic and relatable than anything he raps on "More Life." I've said this a few times recently, but Drake used to have clever, pithy statements which spoke some sort of truth about modern relationships or human nature. I enjoyed his thoughts on fame, fake people, etc., but he gave us absolutely no new perspectives on "Views" (unfortunately the title doesn't even remotely reflect the lyrical content) and he continues to show us no new thoughts or ideas on "More Life." The days of a clever Drake aphorism are long gone. Additionally, the bars on this record are just awful. I found myself cringing nearly every song, and rarely did I come away from a track with a line that stuck out to me as clever or cutting. This is especially annoying because he used to do this so well.


This sort of brings me to my last point - who is the average Drake fan in 2017? My argument is that, back before we knew that Drake had a ghostwriter, his lines were excellent. My hypothesis is he fired his ghostwriter in the midst of the controversy, but I think his lyrical content has suffered tremendously. Here's my issue, though: I don't care about Drake as an artist anymore. I think he already scores so low in terms of authenticity that I don't care if he is just a mouthpiece for a writer. With the HUGE pop appeal of One Dance (and the love it garnered among white America, I would add), what is Drake's place in the world of music? If the average Drake fan is a sub-20 suburban white girl or boy, do they care if Drake has a ghostwriter? My guess is no. Drake has no onus to be authentic, either - I would actually prefer if he had a ghostwriter and the lines were good, because then the music would actually be listenable. Drake has, undeniably, a great voice for rapping (not for singing), a good ability to rap to a beat (if we assume someone else is inventing his flows for him), among other things. But if we're currently getting just Drake writing raps, there needs to be a change. These lyrics are absolute garbage.


Finally, I just wish that Drake wouldn't be such a culture vulture. It pains me to think of the people he's used to skyrocket his own success and the communities of whom Drake routinely fails to recognize in his songs or actions. I think of Migos, ILoveMakkonen, Fetty Wap, and others, who Drake has used and thrown away when they lose value to him. Just as he used "Versace" to try to appeal to the Atlanta trap crowd, he continues to use these artists (Quavo and Travis Scott) on a song on this album. It's incredibly cringeworthy and doesn't fit on the album at all - but my guess is he had to leave it on in a bland attempt at appealing to fans of that genre. Drake is an expert on squeezing all of the culture he needs out of something, setting it aside, then never picking it back up again. It bothers me so much. Not only that, but on a more social scale, Drake raps on "If You're Reading This it's Too Late,": "brand new Beretta, can't wait to let it go." I think it's impossible for me to side with Drake when he shows no effort to address gun violence or urban struggles with his enormous wealth but continues to use imagery of those struggles in his songs when he himself has no right to those images. Or at least, as I understand it. I follow hip-hop with a certain level of interest, but I've never once heard a report that Drake was far below a slightly below-average income person.


I'm tired and this is a little rambling obviously, but this album was a major disappointment and I would rather Drake was just a pop artist who has his lyrics written for him than a rapper who tries to pretend to be authentic.


EDIT: You could draw a parallel to Kanye in terms of "street cred" here - I know that Kanye was not poor growing up, but Kanye still brings extreme amounts of attention to causes and very much uses his influence to focus public opinion on issues. "Murder to Excellence," "Diamonds from Sierra Leone," to name two. I think I can't forgive Drake specifically because he seems so braindead to the fact that his words have consequences and he's not helping alleviate any issues.


EDIT: Googling the phrase "Drake donates" turns up Drake donating $75,000 to the high school Meek Mill attended. Chance the Rapper, who earns considerably less, donated $1,000,000 to Chicago public schools. Jay-Z donated $1,000,000 to Black Lives Matter. Where is Drake showing true allegiance to these communities?


EDIT: Also forgot Skepta, who has the best verse on the album. Another rapper Drake will drop when he can't use his style and coolness to generate profits for more executives, again giving no money back to the community he's sucking the blood out of for his own gain.

Last edited by andru (22 Mar 2017 05:21)


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#54 22 Mar 2017 07:57

flatlander
Not a bog

Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

I don't think him being a "culture vulture" is a credible argument against the music itself, nor is him using patois(which i've heard many torontonians use anyways) because you don't have to be part of a scene to use/incorporate their style in your work. i'm almost positive drake doesn't even do this himself, he has teams and camps of people creating/fusing beats for him, scouring the internet for underground stuff all the time.I agree drake probably doesn't care for these communities, but he's not obligated to.


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#55 22 Mar 2017 09:56

funbox
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Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

40 is the real mvp in the drake-game
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwyjxsOYnys
but it has become significantly more 'watered' down lately - in terms of weird production techniques at least and exploring different sonic realms



listen to this track, there is no high end at all, except for drake's voice. and it works.

Last edited by funbox (22 Mar 2017 09:57)

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#56 22 Mar 2017 21:08

andru
DWYANE WADE

Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

flatlander wrote:

I don't think him being a "culture vulture" is a credible argument against the music itself, nor is him using patois(which i've heard many torontonians use anyways) because you don't have to be part of a scene to use/incorporate their style in your work. i'm almost positive drake doesn't even do this himself, he has teams and camps of people creating/fusing beats for him, scouring the internet for underground stuff all the time.I agree drake probably doesn't care for these communities, but he's not obligated to.

I disagree, I'll amend my statement to say that don't think you have to be a part of a culture to use aspects of their culture, such as using dancehall elements in his beats, but speaking Patois is silly and definitely a little appropriative (is that a word?). I think there's a limit to this thinking in that I expect most white rappers to put on an "urban" (or whichever term works best) accent when rapping, it's strange (but works for some rappers styles occasionally) when a white rapper raps in a "white" voice. But I would argue that it's also important for any white rapper to not just take from this culture the things they want and give nothing back - it's essentially saying I'm going to utilize the parts of your culture which I find interesting but ignore and not try to aid the underlying issues which created this culture in the first place. I definitely agree there's a limit - like, what do you "owe" a culture just for using their style? Like, does Lil Ugly Mane have to "give back" to Memphis for using the underground Memphis sounds of the 90's? I don't know, I don't think so. But I think I draw the line at Drake who's meow made millions off of "One Dance" and "Views" and meow "More Life," on the backs of a style which he co-opted for his own use. I think that's kind of shitty, and I would expect him to make a greater effort to reach out and speak out about problems facing that community or something. Simply, I don't think it's fair to make money off of a culture that's not yours and then do nothing to help those communities. Drake sort of gets a pass for it because he's mixed, but I'm sure if a white Toronto artist came along and starting speaking in Patois and using dancehall elements he'd be called out for cultural appropriation as well.


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#57 22 Mar 2017 23:11

funbox
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Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

andru wrote:

Drake sort of gets a pass for it because he's mixed, but I'm sure if a white Toronto artist came along and starting speaking in Patois and using dancehall elements he'd be called out for cultural appropriation as well.

that's true, but i think u have to think about it on a personal level as well, i mean drake is friends with popcaan and that whole crew and has released music with him so he's not just "stealing culture" it seems like he has a foot in it as well, but i dont rly know, thats just how it looks from the outside


i think about appropriation of cultures a lot, in regards to middle eastern music and music from south america. its kind of hot to draw on the rhythms of south american popular/club music and bring into a european club context.

cultural property or stylistic musical artifacts/gimmicks?

Last edited by funbox (22 Mar 2017 23:12)

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#58 22 Mar 2017 23:57

andru
DWYANE WADE

Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

funbox wrote:
andru wrote:

Drake sort of gets a pass for it because he's mixed, but I'm sure if a white Toronto artist came along and starting speaking in Patois and using dancehall elements he'd be called out for cultural appropriation as well.

that's true, but i think u have to think about it on a personal level as well, i mean drake is friends with popcaan and that whole crew and has released music with him so he's not just "stealing culture" it seems like he has a foot in it as well, but i dont rly know, thats just how it looks from the outside


i think about appropriation of cultures a lot, in regards to middle eastern music and music from south america. its kind of hot to draw on the rhythms of south american popular/club music and bring into a european club context.

cultural property or stylistic musical artifacts/gimmicks?

You're right - it's not as though Drake doesn't even associate with these artists. The most I can give him is that he is friends with artists and does give them a platform - putting Skepta, popcaan, etc., on his albums, but I would really be interested to see if he's still friends with them in a few years or just using them to his own benefit. That's purely speculation, though, and it is true that for the time being he is friends with them.


I think cultural appropriation is definitely real but as SJW as I sounded in my Drake critique, I'm also super wary of it and think there is an acceptable amount of cultural "fusion" which can occur without being appropriative (if that's a word). Like, if a white person really loves empanadas, I don't think they shouldn't be allowed to fuse empanadas with a white dish for fear of backlash of the community. My concern is with how genuine it is. My opinion on Drake is that his use of cultures that aren't his is insidious in that it lacks depth - it's the musical equivalent of a Navajo-print t-shirt from Urban Outfitters, and to me it seems like he's using the dancehall/grime scenes in order to accelerate and boost his own career while only paying skin-deep respect to those cultures.


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#59 23 Mar 2017 01:03

funbox
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Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

andru wrote:
funbox wrote:
andru wrote:

Drake sort of gets a pass for it because he's mixed, but I'm sure if a white Toronto artist came along and starting speaking in Patois and using dancehall elements he'd be called out for cultural appropriation as well.

that's true, but i think u have to think about it on a personal level as well, i mean drake is friends with popcaan and that whole crew and has released music with him so he's not just "stealing culture" it seems like he has a foot in it as well, but i dont rly know, thats just how it looks from the outside


i think about appropriation of cultures a lot, in regards to middle eastern music and music from south america. its kind of hot to draw on the rhythms of south american popular/club music and bring into a european club context.

cultural property or stylistic musical artifacts/gimmicks?

You're right - it's not as though Drake doesn't even associate with these artists. The most I can give him is that he is friends with artists and does give them a platform - putting Skepta, popcaan, etc., on his albums, but I would really be interested to see if he's still friends with them in a few years or just using them to his own benefit. That's purely speculation, though, and it is true that for the time being he is friends with them.


I think cultural appropriation is definitely real but as SJW as I sounded in my Drake critique, I'm also super wary of it and think there is an acceptable amount of cultural "fusion" which can occur without being appropriative (if that's a word). Like, if a white person really loves empanadas, I don't think they shouldn't be allowed to fuse empanadas with a white dish for fear of backlash of the community. My concern is with how genuine it is. My opinion on Drake is that his use of cultures that aren't his is insidious in that it lacks depth - it's the musical equivalent of a Navajo-print t-shirt from Urban Outfitters, and to me it seems like he's using the dancehall/grime scenes in order to accelerate and boost his own career while only paying skin-deep respect to those cultures.

i think you're right and drake is definitely appropriating cultures that he has no roots in for nothing more than financial gain a lot of the time, but i like a lot of his music and him as an artist, so its hard for me to be negative. afterall, he is nothing but the canadian Craig David
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jdcmM9T … 3F5ROzS3Za
#backontopic
but rly, craig david is the british drake, before drake even! (also because craig david is appropriating garage/2step in his music)

Last edited by funbox (23 Mar 2017 01:06)

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#60 23 Mar 2017 01:47

andru
DWYANE WADE

Re: music we can listen to that you're listening to

I definitely like a lot of Drake's music, in his discography he's made some of my favorite songs as well as some of the most listenable music.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dxy574tBK5A


From Time is one of my favorite tracks of his personally. Actually, I would have to say that for me, NWTS is my favorite Drake album to date. I would say the album I like the songs off of the most is IYRTITL just because it starts so well and ends so fantastically, but I feel like sonically NWTS is so cohesive and refreshing. I'm a big Noah "40" Shebib fan and I feel like he couldn't have gotten the beats better.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIkJMPPQn6c


Tuscan Leather actually might be my top three favorite beats ever made, period.


EDIT: Again: Here, on Tuscan Leather, is exactly why I loved Drake: "I'm honest, I make mistakes, I be the second to admit it." That level of wit, for me, is nowhere to be found on "More Life"

Last edited by andru (23 Mar 2017 01:52)


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